Hello world!

Posted: March 16, 2011 in Uncategorized

Welcome to WordPress.com. This is your first post. Edit or delete it and start blogging!

Frontline Radio

Lloyd Frontline (formerly Brooklyn Buoyark)

I have been collecting and playing music since my school days(with lots of encouragement and support from my father), at age of thirteen me and my two older brother, began playing weekly reggae nights for under18’s at a club call Ashanti, on Stanley Grove, Longsight, Manchester. This was then to be repeated in various location including social clubs, church halls and youth clubs, setting the stage for the beginnings of my involvement in youth and community activities. It also supplied me, with the skills required in the art of making a crowd rock from the front, to the back row.

In the 80’s my, Infatuation with reggae music continued with me becoming a disciple of ‘Megatone Sound System’, beginning my apprenticeship as a Box Boy. It wasn’t long before I became the Technician, graduating to Operator and Selector, (Taking ‘Brooklyn Buoyark’ as my sound name).

On a cold wet Manchester evening in October 1989 a Community Radio Station with a difference was , together with two of my  brothers (Hedley aka Ninja and Trevor aka Dan Man) along with some like mind friends we established Manchester’s first 24 hour All Reggae Music radio station ‘Frontline Radio’,

(first tagline “Frontline: It’s where the Action is”).

The stations name and its first tagline “Frontline: It’s where the Action is”, came about as a direct response to the negative image Manchester, had acquired, particularly the area where I live, Moss Side, referred to by the media as Gun-chester. Our aim was to create a platform for many of the more positive elements of our community, so we started with what we knew.

Frontline Radio’s philosophy was a simple one, ‘100% Reggae Music to The Maximum’, (station tagline) all things connected to reggae music and the culture surrounding it. Good and bad including all its sub-genres like:

Mento, Ska, Rock Steady, Reggae, Rockers, Root, Dub, Dancehall, Lovers Rock, the UK reggae scene, Ragga (Bashment), Jungle the list goes on, all those genre’s combined with:

The history, its people & communities, events, features, interviews, charts, lifestyle and a real passion for the music, gave voice, status and airtime to a music form, the mainstream media considered to be a bit of a novelty.

Over the next a couple of years, Frontline Radio 101.45fm established itself as one of the leading Pirate Radio stations and “The Voice of Reggae Music” (station tagline), in the North of England. Frontline strived to produce broadcast of the highest of standards and never allowing our efforts to slacken consequently the popularity of this Frontline philosophy led to an increasing number of people wanting and waiting for a slot on the station, so some thing had to be done, 1992 ‘Frontline’ become a radio station with a true difference, seeing the launch of a sister station

FLR Soul 100.7fm (Front Line Radio Soul), a radio station with the same philosophy as Frontline’s 24 hour Reggae music station, only this time it was being applied to all things connected to Hip-hop, Rap and R’n’b much like Reggae music, the mainstream media were not ready to embrace Hip-hop music or its culture.

To be able to replicate the success of the reggae music station and give,

FLR Soul the same passion, status and respect, someone from outside the frontline reggae collective was needed.

Enter T2 Bad (aka Anthony Stevens) and Soul Control sound system,

Soul Control (The people voice & ladies choice) had established themselves as one of the Northwest premier Soul sound systems (in same vein as Jazzy-B’s Soul 2 Soul sound system). T2 bad was called in to Manage FLR Soul

The Frontline, philosophy was not the only thing the new station shared, it also shared the same resources and Broadcasted simultaneously from the same building, which was a unique an innovative set up.

After working together successfully for two year there was a parting of ways and FLR Soul 100.7fm was disbanded paving the way for the birth of

Soul Nation, which went on to start a new chapter in the Manchester’s R’n’b

and Hip-hop music scene.

Frontline Radio 101.45fm continued to go from strength to strength broadcasting Reggae Music twenty 4 seven, 365 days of the year.

After numerous raid by the D.T.I., £1000’s worth of fines and threatened imprisonment, Frontline Radio made its last broadcast on November 5 1996.

Now this is only a brief summary of a period in Manchester’s music history that includes many other individual and organisation that have not been mentioned I hope I manage to get time to fill in some of the blank spaces. May be in my next blog I give a full role call of anyone who has taken part or been involved.

I’m currently working as a Freelance Lecture/Radio Trainer, Liaising with community groups and volunteers. I have worked with All FM 96.9, Wythenshawe FM 97.2, Radio Regen, Mancat, Stockport College and Wythenshawe Youth Arts Network to name a few.

“There are only a few things (raising my son Chike, been one), that I have done in my life that I have been able to get as exited about, as energised by or as passionately invested in as Broadcasting. I have learned that, that passion can be quite contagious”.

P.S.

If you were living in Manchester or the Northwest region, from the mid 80’s to the mid to late 90’s and listened or had some connection with Frontline radio. Please get in touch with me,

Email: lloydfrontline@hotmail.co.uk

P.P.S

If you used to listen and you have any frontline Radio old recordings, flyers or photo’s get in touch

Email: lloydfrontline@hotmail.co.uk

Lloyd Frontline (aka Brooklyn Buoyark)

Goto: Caribbean Connexion Show

FLR Soul DJ Roll Call

Posted: January 16, 2007 in Presenters & DJ's

DJ Roll Call

Andy & Nadine (Primetime)
DJ Delight
DJ Sarge
DJ Whizz aka Madhatter
Genius (Nitro)
Markie B (South Central)
Mavvy Dee
Natty
Shortdog (South Central)
Sweatbox (Nitro/Soul Control)
T Chill (South Central)
T2 Bad (Soul Control)
Rob Bass (Soul Control)
Uncle
This is not a complete list more to be added
If your name SHOULD be up here

Frontline Radio DJ Roll Call

Posted: January 16, 2007 in Presenters & DJ's
Arc Angel (RIP)
Article
Bella Irie
Barry G & Bigga
Bongo
Captain & Kizzy
CB2000
Count D
Colonel
Doctor C & Standguard
Dr Pebbs
DJ Rickochet & Mc Skanka
GP
Jah Glee
JP Bizzy
Lady Dee aka (L Dee) & Kay Bee (Double Trouble)
Lateman
Mafa T, Cutty Mello, Singing Vibe (Redstar Crew)
Mr Brown
Mr Womble aka Comercial Man/Mr HMV (Baron Turbo Charge)
Mysterious P
Original Cool-Forget-Everyting!!!
Ralph (Far East Sound System)
Ranking
Ras Dread
Roots Daughter
Sticks & Patrick ‘P’ Davies (Symbolic Crew/Megatone)
Tallman & Shortman
Tippa Gee & Q-Bass
Wilie Dan & Jnr Ninja (Mayhem)
Yoyo & Flexy J
Wilie Max (Tarus)
This is not a complete list more to be added
If your name SHOULD be up here

Frontline Radio

Posted: September 12, 2006 in Organizations

Frontline Radio

Lloyd Frontline aka Brooklyn Buoyark

   

I have been collecting and playing music since my school days(with lots of encouragement and support from my father), at age of thirteen me and my two older brother, began playing weekly reggae nights for under18’s at a club call Ashanti, on Stanley Grove, Longsight, Manchester. This was then to be repeated in various location including social clubs, church halls and youth clubs, setting the stage for the beginnings of my involvement in youth and community activities. It also supplied me, with the skills required in the art of making a crowd rock from the front, to the back row. 

 

In the 80’s my, Infatuation with reggae music continued with me becoming a disciple of ‘Megatone Sound System’, beginning my apprenticeship as a Box Boy. It wasn’t long before I became the Technician, graduating to Operator and Selector, (Taking ‘Brooklyn Buoyark’ as my sound name).      

On a cold wet Manchester evening in October 1989 a Community Radio Station with a difference was , together with two of my  brothers (Hedley aka Ninja and Trevor aka Dan Man) along with some like mind friends we established Manchester’s first 24 hour All Reggae Music radio station ‘Frontline Radio’, (first tagline “Frontline: It’s where the Action is”).

 

The stations name and its first tagline “Frontline: It’s where the Action is”, came about as a direct response to the negative image Manchester, had acquired, particularly the area where I live, Moss Side, referred to by the media as Gun-chester. Our aim was to create a platform for many of the more positive elements of our community, so we started with what we knew.

     

Frontline Radio’s philosophy was a simple one, ‘100% Reggae Music to The Maximum’, (station tagline) all things connected to reggae music and the culture surrounding it. Good and bad including all its sub-genres like:

Mento, Ska, Rock Steady, Reggae, Rockers, Root, Dub, Dancehall, Lovers Rock, the UK reggae scene, Ragga (Bashment), Jungle the list goes on, all those genre’s combined with:

The history, its people & communities, events, features, interviews, charts, lifestyle and a real passion for the music, gave voice, status and airtime to a music form, the mainstream media considered to be a bit of a novelty.

 

Over the next a couple of years, Frontline Radio 101.45fm established itself as one of the leading Pirate Radio stations and “The Voice of Reggae Music” (station tagline),  in the North of England. Frontline strived to produce broadcast of the highest of standards and never allowing our efforts to slacken consequently the popularity of this Frontline philosophy led to an increasing number of people wanting and waiting for a slot on the station, so some thing had to be done, 1992 ‘Frontline’ become a radio station with a true difference, seeing the launch of a sister station

 

FLR Soul 100.7fm (Front Line Radio Soul), a radio station with the same philosophy as Frontline’s 24 hour Reggae music station, only this time it was being applied to all things connected to Hip-hop, Rap and R’n’b much like Reggae music, the mainstream media were not ready to embrace Hip-hop music or its culture.

 

To be able to replicate the success of the reggae music station and give,

FLR Soul the same passion, status and respect, someone from outside the frontline reggae collective was needed.  

 

Enter T2 Bad (aka Anthony Stevens) and Soul Control sound system,

Soul Control (The people voice & ladies choice) had established themselves as one of the Northwest premier Soul sound systems (in same vein as Jazzy-B’s Soul 2 Soul sound system). T2 bad was called in to Manage FLR Soul

 

The Frontline, philosophy was not the only thing the new station shared, it also shared the same resources and Broadcasted simultaneously from the same building, which was a unique an innovative set up.

 

After working together successfully for two year there was a parting of ways and FLR Soul 100.7fm was disbanded paving the way for the birth of

Soul Nation, which went on to start a new chapter in the Manchester’s R’n’b

and Hip-hop music scene.

 

Frontline Radio 101.45fm continued to go from strength to strength broadcasting Reggae Music twenty 4 seven, 365 days of the year.

After numerous raid by the D.T.I., £1000’s worth of fines and threatened imprisonment, Frontline Radio made its last broadcast on November 5 1996.

 

Now this is only a brief summary of a period in Manchester’s music history that includes many other individual and organisation that have not been mentioned I hope I manage to get time to fill in some of the blank spaces. May be in my next blog I give a full role call of anyone who has taken part or been involved.

 

I’m currently working as a Freelance Lecture/Radio Trainer, Liaising with community groups and volunteers. I have worked with All FM 96.9, Wythenshawe FM 97.2, Radio Regen, Mancat, Stockport College and Wythenshawe Youth Arts Network to name a few.


“There are only a few things (raising my son Chike, been one), that I have done in my life that I have been able to get as exited about, as energised by or as passionately invested in as Broadcasting. I have learned that, that passion can be quite contagious”.

 

P.S.

 

If you were living in Manchester or the Northwest region, from the mid 80’s to the mid to late 90’s and listened or had some connection with Frontline radio. Please get in touch with me,

 

Email: lloydfrontline@hotmail.co.uk 

 

P.P.S

 

If you used to listen and you have any frontline Radio old recordings, flyers or photo’s get in touch

 

Email: lloydfrontline@hotmail.co.uk

 

Lloyd Frontline (aka Brooklyn Buoyark)

Goto: Caribbean Connexion Show